Personal licence

If you have a personal licence you can sell alcohol at either a temporary event notice or in a licensed premises. You can also authorise someone else to sell alcohol.

You need a personal licence if you want to be a designated premises supervisor (DPS). The DPS will normally be the person who has day-to-day responsibility for running the premises.

There may be several personal licence holders working at a premises but there can only be one DPS. The premises licence holder must appoint the DPS.

To apply you’ll need to have completed a training course and exam to get a level 2 award for personal licence holders.

We will only issue personal licences to people who live within our district. If you work in our district but live elsewhere, you’ll need to apply to your local council.

You can use your personal licence to sell alcohol or authorise the sale of alcohol anywhere with a premises licence in England and Wales.

Personal licences do not expire.

Licence holders can also request up to 50 temporary event notices in each calendar year, subject to restrictions.

You will need to tell us of any relevant convictions you may have.

Apply for a personal licence

To apply you’ll need

  • a basic criminal background check (DBS) which is less than a month old at the time of the application
  • a level 2 personal licence holders award
  • documents showing you have the right to work in the UK
  • 2 recent colour identical passport sized photos, you should get one signed on the back by a professional with the wording, I can confirm that this photo is a true likeness of (applicant’s name)

After selecting the button below you’ll need to:

  1. Have a credit or debit card for payment.
  2. Create an account if you do not already have one.
  3. Select licensing.
  4. Select apply for a licence.
  5. Select Licensing Act 2003.
  6. Select personal licence
  7. Select A1- new L73 - personal licence
  8. Follow the onscreen instructions.

There is a fee for this service.

Apply for a personal licence

 

Replacing or changing details on your personal licence

To change something on your personal licence, for example your name or address, you’ll need to complete our online form.

There will be a fee for any changes.

Change of details on a personal licence

Lost or stolen personal licence

To report a lost or stolen personal licence you’ll need to complete our online form.

There will be a fee for the replacement licence.

Lost or stolen personal licence

Right to work

We have a legal duty to ensure that we do not issue any licences to any person who does not have the right to work in the UK.

If you do not have any immigration restrictions then to prove your right to work status, you'll need to supply ID from the following:

  • passport which shows you are a British citizen or a citizen of the UK and Colonies
  • a passport or national identity card showing you are a national of a European Economic Area (EEA) country or Switzerland
  • a registration certificate or Document Certifying Permanent Residence issued by the Home Office to you as a national of an EEA country or Switzerland
  • a Permanent Residence Card issued by the Home Office to you as a family member of a national of an EEA country or Switzerland
  • a current Biometric Immigration Document issued by the Home Office showing that you can stay indefinitely in the UK or that you have no time limit on your stay in the UK
  • a current passport endorsed to show that you are exempt from immigration control, that you can stay indefinitely in the UK, have the right of abode in the UK or have no time limit on your stay in the UK
  • a current Immigration Status Document issued by the Home Office with an endorsement indicating that you are allowed to stay indefinitely in the UK or have no time limit on your stay in the UK together with an official document giving your National Insurance number and your name issued by a government agency or previous employer
  • a birth or adoption certificate issued in the UK, Channel Islands, Isle of Man or Ireland together with an official document giving your permanent National Insurance number and your name issued by a government agency or an earlier employer
  • a certificate of registration or naturalisation as a British citizen together with an official document giving your permanent National Insurance number and your name issued by a government agency or an earlier employer

If there are immigration restrictions then to prove your right to work status, you’ll need to supply ID from the following:

  • a current passport endorsed to show that you can stay in the UK and are currently allowed to do this type of work
  • a current Biometric Immigration Document issued by the Home Office which shows that you can currently stay in the UK and can do this type of work
  • a current Residence Card (including an Accession Residence Card or a Derivative Residence Card) issued by the Home Office issued to you as a non-European Economic Area (EEA) national who is a family member of a national of a EEA country or Switzerland or who has a derivative right of residence
  • a current Immigration Status Document containing a photograph issued by the Home Office to you with a valid endorsement indicating you may stay in the UK and are allowed to do this type of work along with an official document giving your permanent National Insurance number and your name issued by a government agency or an earlier employer
  • a Certificate of Application issued by the Home Office under regulation 17(3) or 18A(2) of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006 to you as a family member of a national of a EEA country or Switzerland stating you are permitted to take employment which is less than 6 months old together with verification from the Home Office Evidence and Enquiry Unit (the application may be granted for 6 months from the date of the Certificate of Application)
  • a Verification issued by the Home Office Evidence and Enquiry Unit which shows that you may stay in the UK because you have an in-time application, appeal or administrative review which is outstanding (the licences may be issued from 6 months from the date of the licence decision)

Relevant convictions

You must tell us if you have a conviction for any of the following offences.

  1. An offence under this Act.
  2. An offence under any of the following enactments –
    (a) Schedule 12 to the London Government Act 1963 (c.33) (public entertainment licensing);
    (b) the Licensing Act 1964 (c.26);
    (c) the Private Places of Entertainment (Licensing) Act 1967 (c.19);
    (d) section 13 of the Theatres Act 1968 (c.54);
    (e) the Late-Night Refreshment Houses Act 1969 (c.53);
    (f) section 6 of, or Schedule 1 to, the Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1982 (c.30);
    (g) the Licensing (Occasional Permissions) Act 1983 (c.24);
    (h) the Cinemas Act 1985 (c.13);
    (i) the London Local Authorities Act 1990 (c.vii).
  3. An offence under the Firearms Act 1968 (c.27).
  4. An offence under section 1 of the Trade Descriptions Act 1968 (c.29) (false trade description of goods) in circumstances where the goods in question are or include alcohol.
  5. An offence under any of the following provisions of the Theft Act 1968 (c.60) –
    (a) section 1 (theft);
    (b) section 8 (robbery);
    (c) section 9 (burglary);
    (d) section 10 (aggravated burglary);
    (e) section 11 (removal of articles from places open to the public);
    (f) section 12A (aggravated vehicle taking), in circumstances where subsection (2)(b) of that section applies and the accident caused the death of any person;
    (g) section 13 (abstracting of electricity);
    (h) section 15 (obtaining property by deception);
    (i) section 15A (obtaining a money transfer by deception);
    (j) section 16 (obtaining pecuniary advantage by deception);
    (k) section 17 (false accounting);
    (l) section 19 (false statements by company directors);
    (m) section 20 (suppression, for example of documents);
    (n) section 21 (blackmail);
    (o) section 22 (handling stolen goods);
    (p) section 24A (dishonestly retaining a wrongful credit);
    (q) section 25 (going equipped for stealing).
  6. An offence under section 7(2) of the Gaming Act 1968 (c.65) (allowing child to take part in gaming on premises licensed for the sale of alcohol).
  7. An offence under any of the following provisions of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (c.38) –
    (a) section 4(2) (production of a controlled drug);
    (b) section 4(3) (supply of a controlled drug);
    (c) section 5(3) (possession of a controlled drug with intent to supply);
    (d) section 8 (permitting activities to take place on premises).
  8. An offence under either of the following provisions of the Theft Act 1978 (c.31) –
    (a) section 1 (obtaining services by deception);
    (b) section 2 (evasion of liability by deception).
  9. An offence under either of the following provisions of the Customs and Excise Management Act 1979 (c.2) –
    (a) section 170 (disregarding subsection (1)(a)) (fraudulent evasion of duty);
    (b) section 170B (taking preparatory steps for evasion of duty).
  10. An offence under either of the following provisions of the Tobacco Products Duty Act 1979 (c.7) –
    (a) section 8G (possession and sale of unmarked tobacco);
    (b) section 8H (use of premises for sale of unmarked tobacco).
  11. An offence under the forgery and Counterfeiting Act 1981 (c.45) (other than an offence under section 18 or 19 of that Act).
  12. An offence under the Firearms (Amendment) Act 1988 (c.45).
  13. 13. An offence under any of the following provisions of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (c.48) –
    (a) section 107(1)(d)(iii) (public exhibition in the course of a business of article infringing copyright);
    (b) section 107(3) (infringement of copyright by public performance of work);
    (c) section 198(2) (broadcast of recording of performance made without sufficient consent);
    (d) section 297(1) (fraudulent reception of transmission);
    (e) section 297A(1) (supply of unauthorised decoder).
  14. An offence under any of the following provisions of the Road Traffic Act 1988 (c.52) –
    (a) section 3A (causing death by careless driving while under the influence of drink or drugs);
    (b) section 4 (driving a vehicle when under the influence of drink or drugs);
    (c) section 5 (driving a vehicle with alcohol concentration above prescribed limit).
  15. An offence under either of the following provisions of the Food Safety Act 1990 (c.16) in circumstances where the food in question is or includes alcohol –
    (a) section 14 (selling food or drink not of the nature, substance or quality demanded);
    (b) section 15 (falsely describing or presenting food or drink).
  16. An offence under section 92(1) or (2) of the Trademarks Act 1994 (c.26) (unauthorised use of trademark, in relation to goods) in circumstances where the goods in question are or include alcohol.
  17. An offence under the Firearms (Amendment) Act 1997 (c.5).
  18. A sexual offence, within the meaning of section 161(2) of the Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000 (c.6).
  19. A violent offence, within the meaning of section 161(3) of that Act.
  20. An offence under section 3 of the Private Security Industry Act 2001 (c.12) (engaging in certain activities relating to security without a licence)